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twitter.com/FeministPress:

    Why Are We Such Assholes About Country Music? →

    feminspire:

    Miranda Lambert, from "The House That Built Me" video.

    What country music does at its finest is to tell a personal narrative. Too often, the history of rural small town America is either erased or falsified into an overtly nostalgic value set in pop culture. It is important to share these stories, and to open up this genre to voices we might not…

    By our own former FP intern (who may or may not be self-promo-ing this right now, promise this is my last post!) Madeleine

    — 1 day ago with 18 notes
    QUEER THEORY AND LITERATURE 101: THE BOOK LIST

    The last in our series of four installments from the Feminist Press, here are queer theory essentials, because you cannot understand the intersections of gender and sexuality, without sexuality. All books are linked to their publisher’s purchase page, not Amazon. Most are published by independent presses.

    • Epistemology of the Closet- Eve Sedgwick innovates what we now call a “queer reading.” Look specifically for her introduction, Axiomatic, where she argues against any kind of absolution or binary when it comes to gender and sexuality.
    • Spit and Passion- Christy C. Road’s graphic novel about her experience as a closeted twelve-year-old in a Cuban Catholic family obsessed with Green Day, a story about how music can save a soul.
    • A History of Sexuality- Michel Foucault’s three-volume pioneer for sexuality studies that studies how sex has always existed in public discourse (even when we don’t see it!), a fascinating and essential read.
    • Testo Junkie- Beatriz Preciado continues where Foucault’s History of Sexuality left off, highlighting how hormones modify how we concieve of our bodies, and how pharmaceutical and pornographic industries produce desire.
    • Tango- by Justin Vivian Bond, a memoir of “difference” and an utterly relatable tale of adolescence, told from the trans/queer kid who joined the cub scouts and had secret trysts with the bully next door.
    • My New Gender Workbook- Kate Bornstein writes an accessible guide and fun framework to living with, without, and in between genders.
    • We Walk Alone- When Ann Aldrich’s book came out in 1955, it was the first in its field. In this memoir and investigative work of journalism, she writes about the underground urban lesbian culture of New York City.
    • Fun Home- Alison Bechdel writes a startling personal narrative and comic history, a countercultural icon for lesbian and lgbtq narratives.
    • New Lesbian Studies- this collection, edited by Bonnie Zimmerman and Toni McNaron, reveals the differences between lesbian perspectives and activisms. Writings about theory, practice, and lived experience.
    • Stranger on Lesbos- Valerie Taylor wrote three explosive and utterly entertaining lesbian pulp fictions. When a bored housewife meets Blake, a butch lesbian, at a community college course, her world opens.
    • Black Queer Studies- E. Patrick Johnson and Mae G. Henderson, a groundbreaking volume to increase visibility of queer, black communities, and the erasure of black communities and perspectives within the LGBTQ movement.
    • Pissing in a River- A lesbian punk-soundrack by Lorrie Sprecher, this intoxicating and hilarious novel depicts young Amanda who moves to London to get immersed in its punk and queer activist scene.
    • Gender Trouble- Judith Butler writes against feminism’s tendency to essentialize sex and gender, rewriting how we think of gender as learned and performative rather than a priori reality.
    • Queer Ideas- An essential and interdisciplinary introduction to queer ideas, a collection of the key thinkers of today and yesterday reflecting on their experiences and theorizing into new fields.
    — 5 days ago with 44 notes
    #queer  #lgbtq  #judith butler  #sex  #gender 
    venus x and asma maroof on feminism, friendship and making it in a man's world →

    Venus X: I’m definitely a feminist, but I don’t agree with all of that stuff that people are calling feminism right now. Feminism isn’t just about women or just about gender, it’s about making everyone acceptable. People in wheelchairs, trans people, poor people, black people, everyone! But now, people are using feminism only to speak about sexuality and sexual freedom. The world doesn’t become a better place because you showed your ass in a thong on Instagram. That’s not intersectional. That doesn’t reflect the progressive ideals of feminism, it’s like going back two waves of feminism. It’s not the 60s, we already made those strides. In the 80s and 90s, feminism was redefined as something that should include racism and disabilities, but nobody’s talking about that. Nobody wants to say that the person who’s fat and doesn’t look like Beyonce is actually more of a feminism than Beyonce. Poor little feminism. The word is just getting pimped out!

    — 1 week ago with 9 notes
    #venus x  #asma maroof  #FEMINISM  #intersectionality  #words  #more than words 

    asylum-art:

    Intricate Book Art Carvings by Brian Dettmer

    on Flickr

    Born in Chicago but currently living and working out of Atlanta, Georgia, contemporary artist Brian Dettmer creates incredible works of art with old books and tremendous patience. Using knives, tweezers and surgical tools, Brian meticulously exposes various layers to create his mind-blowing artwork. Dettmer has received critical acclaim around the world and his work can be found in countless galleries and publications. Below you will find a small sample of his art along with an artist bio and statement from Dettmer. Be sure to visit Brian’s official site: briandettmer.com for more information and photographs of his fantastic art.

    (via bookporn)

    — 1 week ago with 5504 notes
    #art  #book  #book art  #sculpture  #Brian Dettmer 

    sonofbaldwin:

    These are some of the ways white solidarity in regard to fighting against anti-black racism can appear.

    These are some ways in which white people can be comrades to black people.

    Neither of these individuals are running around saying, “Look at me! Look at how I’m so excellent at being a good white person!” Neither of them said, “Hey! But not all white people…!” They, in fact, said, “Too many white people…!” and got to work. Neither of them has to convince black people of their intentions. What they did was say, “How can I be of service?” and, when told, did as they were asked. They were not there to condescend to black people or speak over black people or pretend to be able to know what it must be like to be black in America. They were there to support the cause, which they recognized as imperative for our liberation and their own.

    They put themselves in harm’s way (and when you are allied with black people in a bold and physical way, you have definitely, automatically placed yourself in harm’s way by your mere proximity to black bodies and causes, because the System’s aim is not always true) not because it wins them a gold star for the White Ally Games, but because they know that injustice anywhere is injustice everywhere and whatever evils are perpetrated against black peoples, it’s only a matter of time before those same evils are perpetrated against non-black peoples.

    In other words, they are not, to paraphrase James Baldwin, Liberals; that is to say, they aren’t missionaries placing themselves in the mix to feel good about themselves. They know, as much as we do, that Whiteness must be abolished. They are not oblivious to their own privileges, showing up in name only in order to score political correctness points. They, rather, understand that the duty to fight against anti-black racism is the duty of anyone who wishes to think of themselves as an actual human being; who, in fact, understands what “humanity” actually means.

    Let these two individuals be some sort of examples to the folks who insist upon “Not all white people…!”

    Being a comrade is an action. It is not going around touting your role as The Exception. It is not seeking balms and cookies from black people for being in touch with your BASIC, BASELINE humanity.

    If you think it is, you’ve been doing this shit ALL WRONG.

    If you have to say “Not all white people…!” if you feel compelled to protect and absolve Whiteness in any way, particularly during an event in which Blackness is being annihilated by Whiteness, your priorities have been made clear. You are not comrade; you are enemy.


    [Photo descriptions: A young white man is standing on the grass in the midst of an outdoor, daytime gathering where many individuals, black and white, have shown up. He is holding a sign that says: BLACK LIVES MATTER MIKE BROWN

    A white woman is standing alone on the grass. She is holding a white sign with black letters that reads: “I Shoplifted as a teen. How many times should I be shot? #MikeBrown. She added, in the photo’s description, an additional bit of text:

    “I want to be clear, the purpose of this photo is NOT to infer guilt on Mike Brown. But too often in the killing of black people by cops, alleged guilt of a minor crime is all that is needed for the white public to write them off. I want to circumvent that entire derailment technique, because in the end, it doesn’t matter. If I get caught shoplifting, I don’t get shot eight times. And Michael Brown shouldn’t have, either.”]

    (via yall)

    — 1 week ago with 4448 notes

    pretty-period:

    More girls should join boys’ teams so it could be a tradition and it wouldn’t be so special.” - 13-year-old Mo’Ne Davis, the 18th girl to play in the Little League World Series in its 68-year history, the FIRST girl to throw a Little League World Series SHUTOUT. Her fastball? 70 MILES PER HOUR. #throwlikeagirl #BlackGirlsROCK

    (via becauseiamawoman)

    — 1 week ago with 72094 notes

    ivegotnotoleranceforignorance:

    micdotcom:

    Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

    Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

    Let us not forget their voices

    Shivers.

    — 1 week ago with 24764 notes
    #police violence  #Trayvon Martin  #Michael Brown  #Ferguson  #art 
    Summer 2014 interns signing off

    Hello lovely FP tumblr followers, thanks for (virtually) hanging out with us this summer. It’s been a blast! Sadly, this is goodbye from this account, but you can check out our contributor page if you want to know who we are and if we have blogs you can follow. Thanks again, and watch out for new batch of FP interns soon.

    — 1 week ago with 4 notes
    #interns 
    Hey there, socially conscious bloggers! 
This week’s book recs theme is love, and Nikki and I have come up with some books to feed your need for romance. 
Stranger on Lesbos
What’s a woman to do when she lives in the 1950’s and finds herself bored with her life in the suburb housewife life? Frances, Stranger on Lesbos protagonist, feeling smothered by the typical life of a housewife turns to her education as her salvation. Her studies soon lead her to encounter, Bake, a lesbian studying at the community college to get her M.A. The two delve into a friendship that quickly develops into more as a sexual passion thrives over the course of their many adventures. Frances soon finds she has to decide between choosing the judgmental society she has always known as home or a new world that thrives at the edge of society.  Set in a period of intolerance towards lesbians, Valerie Taylor takes readers for a romantic spin.
-nikki

The Girls in 3-B
"Annice, Pat, and Barbie are best friends from rural Iowa, freshly arrived in booming 1950s Chicago to explore different paths toward independence, self-expression, and sexual freedom. From the hip-hang of a bohemian lifestyle to the sophisticated lure of romance with a handsome, wealthy, married boss, to the happier—but taboo—security of a lesbian relationship, these three experience firsthand the dangers and limitations that await spirited young working girls who strike out on their own in a decidedly male-centered world."
The Girls in 3-B is a great bench-marker for how far we’ve come, yet how much has stayed the same. The protagonists struggle to define their sexualities and simultaneously define themselves, and while the historical climate is certainly different, these struggles resonate with anyone who’s ever longed for a concrete sense of self. Legendary lesbian pulp. Give it a shot, you won’t be disappointed! 

-Pia

    Hey there, socially conscious bloggers! 

    This week’s book recs theme is love, and Nikki and I have come up with some books to feed your need for romance. 

    Stranger on Lesbos

    What’s a woman to do when she lives in the 1950’s and finds herself bored with her life in the suburb housewife life? Frances, Stranger on Lesbos protagonist, feeling smothered by the typical life of a housewife turns to her education as her salvation. Her studies soon lead her to encounter, Bake, a lesbian studying at the community college to get her M.A. The two delve into a friendship that quickly develops into more as a sexual passion thrives over the course of their many adventures. Frances soon finds she has to decide between choosing the judgmental society she has always known as home or a new world that thrives at the edge of society.  Set in a period of intolerance towards lesbians, Valerie Taylor takes readers for a romantic spin.

    -nikki

    The Girls in 3-B

    "Annice, Pat, and Barbie are best friends from rural Iowa, freshly arrived in booming 1950s Chicago to explore different paths toward independence, self-expression, and sexual freedom. From the hip-hang of a bohemian lifestyle to the sophisticated lure of romance with a handsome, wealthy, married boss, to the happier—but taboo—security of a lesbian relationship, these three experience firsthand the dangers and limitations that await spirited young working girls who strike out on their own in a decidedly male-centered world."

    The Girls in 3-B is a great bench-marker for how far we’ve come, yet how much has stayed the same. The protagonists struggle to define their sexualities and simultaneously define themselves, and while the historical climate is certainly different, these struggles resonate with anyone who’s ever longed for a concrete sense of self. Legendary lesbian pulp. Give it a shot, you won’t be disappointed! 

    -Pia

    — 1 week ago with 15 notes

    withfiendfyre:

    These posters are in the stalls of the bathrooms at my university (at least in the ladies, I haven’t asked anyone if they’re in the gents too. I hope so though). Thank you National Union of Students for doing it right. If only they put these posters up in all public bathrooms

    (via thefrisky)

    — 1 week ago with 101153 notes

    fuckyeahfeministcinema:

    An Excerpt from the Forthcoming Feature Documentary, GRRRL (Vega Darling, 2013) is a 10 minute short commissioned for Alien She, the first major art exhibition on riot grrrl. 

    This short was created early in shooting GRRRL and includes interviews with Kathleen Hanna (Bikini Kill, Le Tigre, The Julie Ruin), Erin Smith (Bratmobile, Cold Cold Hearts), Molly Neuman (Bratmobile), Julia Serano, Matt Wobensmith (Outpunk!), Larry-Bob Roberts (Holy Tit Clamps), Stella Zine (Pagan Holiday), Penny Arcade, Theo Kogan (Lunachicks), Violent Vickie, Anna Joy Springer (Blatz, Cypher in the Snow), Ladyfest Bay Area (2012), Brontez Purnell (Gravy Train!!!!, The Younger Lovers), Kembra Pfahler (The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black), the Degenerettes, War on Women, Dental Dames, and Shirle Hale (Womyn of Destruction).

    GRRRL: 25 Years of Riot Grrrl  (Vega Darling and Angie Young), is currently in production. 


    grrrlmovie.com

    Fans of The Riot Grrrl Collection might want to check this out!

    (via slutgrrrlinternational)

    — 1 week ago with 35 notes
    #riot grrrl  #the riot grrrl collection 

    mermantears:

    All About That Bass - BODY POSITIVE VERSION (Ukulele Cover)


    ok HOW IS THIS VIDEO NOT ALL OVER TUMBLR. Her version is really insightful and a truly body positive version for people of all body types, and promotes the idea that women should not seek the approval of men to validate themselves.

    youtuber racheltastik u cool, u cool

    (Source: youtube.com, via feminspire)

    — 1 week ago with 323 notes
    #all about that bass  #ukelele cover  #racheltastik  #body positive  #fix it