Ask me anything   FP Book Guest Reviews Submission   About the Feminist Press   Internships   Recent Releases   

The Feminist Press: From the Desk of the Feminist Press Interns.

twitter.com/FeministPress:

    jovan-israel:

Heroína: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz ♡

It’s National Poetry Month! Do yourself a favor and read Sor Juana Ines De La Cruz’s The Answer, her impassioned response to years of attempts by church officials to silence her.

    jovan-israel:

    Heroína: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 

    It’s National Poetry Month! Do yourself a favor and read Sor Juana Ines De La Cruz’s The Answer, her impassioned response to years of attempts by church officials to silence her.

    (via anjelikah)

    — 1 day ago with 830 notes
    "I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in life. And I am horribly limited."
    Sylvia Plath (via bookporn)

    (Source: story-dj, via bookporn)

    — 6 days ago with 1409 notes
    #sylviaplath 
    nprbooks:

Hooray, hooray, the NPR Books Frogs (still unnamed) Present Friday Reads!  And maybe Firefox won’t crash halfway through my long and elaborate post THIS time.
So I know I said on Twitter that I was going to read Will Elliott’s The Pilgrims, and I may still if there’s time this weekend — but THEN I was idly scanning the shelves and OMG NEW TERRY PRATCHETT.  That was it for this nerd girl.
Boss Lady Tanya is reading ‘This Is How You Lose Her,” and she says “Love. It. So. Much.”
Rose has an ARC of the new Teju Cole, Every Day is For the Thief.
Intern Jordan is checking out Breanne Fahs’ upcoming biography of Valerie Solanas.
And did you know we have not one but TWO Annalisas?  Book News Annalisa is reading Lorrie Moore’s new collection, and Intern Annalisa reports that Janet Mock’s Redefining Realness “does a great job making it very accessible to both those well-versed in trans* issues and those less familiar with the topic.” 
Finally, Camila says, “Gonna pour a big glass of red wine and crack open By Blood We Live. I expect oodles of sex, carnage and high literary references, and Glen Duncan hasn’t let me down yet.” 
What are you reading this weekend?

    nprbooks:

    Hooray, hooray, the NPR Books Frogs (still unnamed) Present Friday Reads!  And maybe Firefox won’t crash halfway through my long and elaborate post THIS time.

    So I know I said on Twitter that I was going to read Will Elliott’s The Pilgrims, and I may still if there’s time this weekend — but THEN I was idly scanning the shelves and OMG NEW TERRY PRATCHETT.  That was it for this nerd girl.

    Boss Lady Tanya is reading ‘This Is How You Lose Her,” and she says “Love. It. So. Much.”

    Rose has an ARC of the new Teju Cole, Every Day is For the Thief.

    Intern Jordan is checking out Breanne Fahs’ upcoming biography of Valerie Solanas.

    And did you know we have not one but TWO Annalisas?  Book News Annalisa is reading Lorrie Moore’s new collection, and Intern Annalisa reports that Janet Mock’s Redefining Realnessdoes a great job making it very accessible to both those well-versed in trans* issues and those less familiar with the topic.” 

    Finally, Camila says, “Gonna pour a big glass of red wine and crack open By Blood We Live. I expect oodles of sex, carnage and high literary references, and Glen Duncan hasn’t let me down yet.”

    What are you reading this weekend?

    — 6 days ago with 39 notes
    #valeriesolanas 
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY, VALERIE (April 9, 1936- April 25, 1988)!
Your capacious feminist fury continues to inspire and influence us all. Though today ends a month of your words on this site, surely the conversations inherent within them will endure for many years to come.
Dear readers, celebrate Valerie’s birth by hopping on over to www.feministpress.org and treating yourself to Valerie Solanas: The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote SCUM (and Shot Andy Warhol). The biography, by Breanne Fahs, is brilliant and insightful. Plus, we all know you can’t go cold turkey post- The FP-Intern-Valerie-athon.
Also, to thank you all for your participation and Valerie-love, FP is offering a 10% discount TODAY on the book in honor of Valerie’s birthday. Just use the coupon code HBDVS2014. 
A million hugz,
Your faithful interns + SCUM enthusiasts
 

 

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY, VALERIE (April 9, 1936- April 25, 1988)!

    Your capacious feminist fury continues to inspire and influence us all. Though today ends a month of your words on this site, surely the conversations inherent within them will endure for many years to come.

    Dear readers, celebrate Valerie’s birth by hopping on over to www.feministpress.org and treating yourself to Valerie Solanas: The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote SCUM (and Shot Andy Warhol). The biography, by Breanne Fahs, is brilliant and insightful. Plus, we all know you can’t go cold turkey post- The FP-Intern-Valerie-athon.

    Also, to thank you all for your participation and Valerie-love, FP is offering a 10% discount TODAY on the book in honor of Valerie’s birthday. Just use the coupon code HBDVS2014. 

    A million hugz,

    Your faithful interns + SCUM enthusiasts

     

     

    — 1 week ago with 10 notes
    #thefeministpress  #feminism  #radicalfeminism  #valeriesolanas  #scum  #scummanifesto 
    57thstreetbooks:

Hablas español?  Nihongo o hanamasuka? Pratar du svenska? Congrats if you do, but no matter if you don’t thanks to the efforts of the most criminally under-appreciated class of craftsmen & women: the literary translators. But luckily Three Percent honors these brave crossers of language barriers annually via their Best Translated Book Award.  This year, authors from 20 different countries and writing in 16 languages were honored. Congrats to all, and we eagerly await the announcement of the shortlist & winner!
Complete list below; click here for ordering info: http://www.semcoop.com/best-translated-longlist
"Horses of God" by Mahi Binebine, translated from the French by Lulu Norman (Morocco; thetinhouse)"Blinding" by Mircea Cartarescu, translated from the Romanian by Sean Cotter (Romania; archipelagobooks)"Textile" by Orly Castel-Bloom, translated from the Hebrew by Dalya Bilu (Israel; thefeministpress)"Sleet" by Stig Dagerman, translated from the Swedish by Steven Hartman (Sweden; David R. Godine)"The Story of a New Name" by Elena Ferrante, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein (Italy; europaeditions)"Tirza" by Arnon Grunberg, translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett (Netherlands; Open Letter Books)"Her Not All Her" by Elfriede Jelinek, translated from the German by Damion Searls (Austria; sylpheditions)"My Struggle: Book Two" by Karl Ove Knausgaard, translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett (Norway; archipelagobooks)"Seiobo There Below" by László Krasznahorkai, translated from the Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet (Hungary; newdirectionspublishing) "Autobiography of a Corpse" by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, translated from the Russian by Joanne Turnbull (Ukraine; NYRB)"The Missing Year" of Juan Salvatierra by Pedro Mairal, translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor (Argentina; New Vessel Press)"The Infatuations" by Javier Marías, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain; randomhouse)"A True Novel" by Minae Mizumura, translated from the Japanese by Juliet Winters (Japan; otherpress)"In the Night of Time" by Antonio Muñoz Molina, translated from the Spanish by Edith Grossman (Spain; hmhbooks)"The African Shore" by Rodrigo Rey Rosa, translated from the Spanish by Jeffrey Gray (Guatemala; yalepress)"Through the Night" by Stig Sæterbakken, translated from the Norwegian by Seán Kinsella (Norway; Dalkey Archive)"Commentary" by Marcelle Sauvageot, translated from the French by Christine Schwartz Hartley & Anna Moschovakis (France; uglyducklingpresse)"Leg Over Leg: Vol. 1" by Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, translated from the Arabic by Humphrey Davies (Lebanon; nyupress​)"The Whispering Muse" by Sjón, translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb (Iceland; fsgbooks)"The Forbidden Kingdom" by Jan Jacob Slauerhoff, translated from the Dutch by Paul Vincent (Netherlands; Pushkin Press)"The Devil’s Workshop" by Jáchym Topol, translated from the Czech by Alex Zucker (Czech Republic; Portobello Books)"The End of Love" by Marcos Giralt Torrente, translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver (Spain; McSweeney’s)"Red Grass" by Boris Vian, translated from the French by Paul Knobloch (France; Tam Tam Books)"City of Angels, or, The Overcoat of Dr. Freud" by Christa Wolf, translated from the German by Damion Searls (Germany; fsgbooks)"Sandalwood Death" by Mo Yan, translated from the Chinese by Howard Goldblatt (China; University of Oklahoma Press)

    57thstreetbooks:

    Hablas españolNihongo o hanamasuka? Pratar du svenska? Congrats if you do, but no matter if you don’t thanks to the efforts of the most criminally under-appreciated class of craftsmen & women: the literary translators. But luckily Three Percent honors these brave crossers of language barriers annually via their Best Translated Book Award. This year, authors from 20 different countries and writing in 16 languages were honored. Congrats to all, and we eagerly await the announcement of the shortlist & winner!

    Complete list below; click here for ordering info: http://www.semcoop.com/best-translated-longlist

    "Horses of God" by Mahi Binebine, translated from the French by Lulu Norman (Morocco; thetinhouse)

    "Blinding" by Mircea Cartarescu, translated from the Romanian by Sean Cotter (Romania; archipelagobooks)

    "Textile" by Orly Castel-Bloom, translated from the Hebrew by Dalya Bilu (Israel; thefeministpress)

    "Sleet" by Stig Dagerman, translated from the Swedish by Steven Hartman (Sweden; David R. Godine)

    "The Story of a New Name" by Elena Ferrante, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein (Italy; europaeditions)

    "Tirza" by Arnon Grunberg, translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett (Netherlands; Open Letter Books)

    "Her Not All Her" by Elfriede Jelinek, translated from the German by Damion Searls (Austria; sylpheditions)

    "My Struggle: Book Two" by Karl Ove Knausgaard, translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett (Norway; archipelagobooks)

    "Seiobo There Below" by László Krasznahorkai, translated from the Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet (Hungary; newdirectionspublishing)

    "Autobiography of a Corpse" by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, translated from the Russian by Joanne Turnbull (Ukraine; NYRB)

    "The Missing Year" of Juan Salvatierra by Pedro Mairal, translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor (Argentina; New Vessel Press)

    "The Infatuations" by Javier Marías, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa (Spain; randomhouse)

    "A True Novel" by Minae Mizumura, translated from the Japanese by Juliet Winters (Japan; otherpress)

    "In the Night of Time" by Antonio Muñoz Molina, translated from the Spanish by Edith Grossman (Spain; hmhbooks)

    "The African Shore" by Rodrigo Rey Rosa, translated from the Spanish by Jeffrey Gray (Guatemala; yalepress)

    "Through the Night" by Stig Sæterbakken, translated from the Norwegian by Seán Kinsella (Norway; Dalkey Archive)

    "Commentary" by Marcelle Sauvageot, translated from the French by Christine Schwartz Hartley & Anna Moschovakis (France; uglyducklingpresse)

    "Leg Over Leg: Vol. 1" by Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, translated from the Arabic by Humphrey Davies (Lebanon; nyupress)

    "The Whispering Muse" by Sjón, translated from the Icelandic by Victoria Cribb (Iceland; fsgbooks)

    "The Forbidden Kingdom" by Jan Jacob Slauerhoff, translated from the Dutch by Paul Vincent (Netherlands; Pushkin Press)

    "The Devil’s Workshop" by Jáchym Topol, translated from the Czech by Alex Zucker (Czech Republic; Portobello Books)

    "The End of Love" by Marcos Giralt Torrente, translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver (Spain; McSweeney’s)

    "Red Grass" by Boris Vian, translated from the French by Paul Knobloch (France; Tam Tam Books)

    "City of Angels, or, The Overcoat of Dr. Freud" by Christa Wolf, translated from the German by Damion Searls (Germany; fsgbooks)

    "Sandalwood Death" by Mo Yan, translated from the Chinese by Howard Goldblatt (China; University of Oklahoma Press)

    — 1 week ago with 16 notes
    #castelbloom  #feministpress  #textile 

    joespub:

    Justin Vivian Bond has a new video out and it’s—of course-awesome.

    Bond returns to Joe’s Pub this week for two performances of The Drift!

    (via riotgrrrlproblems)

    — 1 week ago with 8 notes
    #justinvivianbond 

    itsawomansworld2:

    pro-choice-or-no-voice:

    Abortion statistics and facts! All information, charts and bar graphs are sourced above! A few sources accidentally left out: [x] [x] - Paige

    So to summarize: 

    - 90% feel relief, after going through a safe medical procedure, and are in fact a lot safer than if they would have gone through with the pregnancy 

    - 61% of people who have abortions already have children, they have nothing against children, they just want to be able to control how many they have

    - 98,9% of abortions, i.e. practically all abortions are carried out before the 21st week, that is long before the fetus has any chance to survive outside of the womb (the rest are most likely medical emergencies) 

    - 70% of Americans want to keep Roe vs. Wade

    Why is this still an issue in the US???

    — 1 week ago with 57714 notes
    #abortion  #feminism 
    Valerie: Men and Projection

    Most men men, utterly cowardly, project their inherent weaknesses onto women, label them female weaknesses and believe themselves to have female strengths; most philosophers, not quite so cowardly, face the fact that make lacks exist in men, but still can’t face the fact that they exist in men only. So they label the male condition the Human Condition, post their nothingness problem, which horrifies them, as a philosophical dilemma, thereby giving stature to their animalism, grandiloquently label their nothingness their `Identity Problem’, and proceed to prattle on pompously about the `Crisis of the Individual’, the `Essence of Being’, `Existence preceding Essence’, `Existential Modes of Being’, etc. etc.

    -Valerie Solanas, SCUM Manifesto

    — 1 week ago with 8 notes
    #feminism  #thefeministpress  #radicalfeminism  #scum  #scummanifesto  #valeriesolanas 
    Valerie on Fatherhood

    It is the increase of fatherhood, resulting from the increased and more widespread affluence that fatherhood needs in order to thrive, that has caused the general increase of mindlessness and the decline of women in the United States since the 1920s. The close association of affluence with fatherhood has led, for the most part, to only the wrong girls, namely, the `privileged’ middle class girls, getting `educated’.

    -Valerie Solanas, SCUM Manifesto

    — 1 week ago with 2 notes
    #valeriesolanas  #scum  #scummanifesto 
    Valerie on War

    War: The male’s normal compensation for not being female, namely, getting his Big Gun off, is grossly inadequate, as he can get it off only a very limited number of times; so he gets it off on a really massive scale, and proves to the entire world that he’s a `Man’. Since he has no compassion or ability to empathize or identify, proving his manhood is worth an endless amount of mutilation and suffering and an endless number of lives, including his own — his own life being worthless, he would rather go out in a blaze of glory than to plod grimly on for fifty more years.

    -Valerie Solanas, SCUM Manifesto

    — 1 week ago with 7 notes
    #valeriesolanas  #feminism  #thefeministpress  #scum  #scummanifesto  #radicalfeminism 

    Valerie’s legacy as seen though “To Valerie Solanas and Marilyn Monroe: In Recognition of Their Desperation” (Pauline Oliveros, 1970).

    — 1 week ago with 3 notes
    #valeriesolanas  #feminism  #scummanifesto  #scum  #radicalfeminism  #thefeministpress 
    Valerie Solanas: Dropping Out, An Excellent Policy for Men

    Dropping out is not the answer; fucking-up is. Most women are already    dropped out; they were never in. Dropping out gives control to those few who don’t drop out; dropping out is exactly what the establishment leaders want; it plays into the hands of the enemy; it strengthens the system instead of undermining it, since it is based entirely on the non-participating, passivity, apathy and non-involvement of the mass of women. Dropping out, however, is an excellent policy for men, and SCUM will enthusiastically encourage it.

    -Valerie Solanas, SCUM Manifesto

    — 1 week ago with 5 notes
    #valeriesolanas  #scum  #scummanifesto  #thefeministpress  #feminism  #radicalfeminism 
    johannafateman:

"Life in this society being, at best, an utter bore and no aspect of society of being at all relevant to women, there remains to civic-minded, responsible, thrill-seeking females only to overthrow the government, eliminate the money system, institute complete automation and destroy the male sex." Valerie Solanas, S.C.U.M. Manifesto, 1968
On April 10th, 7PM, I’ll discuss VALERIE SOLANAS: the defiant life of the woman who wrote SCUM (and shot Andy Warhol) with author Breanne Fahs at Bluestockings bookstore. 172 Allen Street, NYC. 
facebook event

    johannafateman:

    "Life in this society being, at best, an utter bore and no aspect of society of being at all relevant to women, there remains to civic-minded, responsible, thrill-seeking females only to overthrow the government, eliminate the money system, institute complete automation and destroy the male sex." Valerie Solanas, S.C.U.M. Manifesto, 1968

    On April 10th, 7PM, I’ll discuss VALERIE SOLANAS: the defiant life of the woman who wrote SCUM (and shot Andy Warhol) with author Breanne Fahs at Bluestockings bookstore. 172 Allen Street, NYC. 

    facebook event

    — 1 week ago with 31 notes
    Valerie Solanas: An Insane Society

    If all women simply left men, refused to have anything to do with any of them — ever, all men, the government, and the national economy would collapse completely. Even without leaving men, women who are aware of the extent of their superiority to and power over men, could acquire complete control over everything within a few weeks, could effect a total submission of males to females. In a sane society the male would trot along obediently after the female. The male is docile and easily led, easily subjected to the domination of any female who cares to dominate him. The male, in fact, wants desperately to be led by females, wants Mama in charge, wants to abandon himself to her care. But this is not a sane society, and most women are not even dimly aware of where they’re at in relation to men.

    -Valerie Solanas, SCUM Manifesto

    — 1 week ago with 9 notes
    #valeriesolanas  #scummanifesto  #scum  #thefeministpress  #radicalfeminism  #feminism