Ask me anything   Submit to #SelfieSummer   About the Feminist Press    Internships    Contributors    Recent Releases    Book Recs    Meet the Staff    

The Feminist Press: From the Desk of the Feminist Press Interns.

twitter.com/FeministPress:

    mermantears:

    All About That Bass - BODY POSITIVE VERSION (Ukulele Cover)


    ok HOW IS THIS VIDEO NOT ALL OVER TUMBLR. Her version is really insightful and a truly body positive version for people of all body types, and promotes the idea that women should not seek the approval of men to validate themselves.

    youtuber racheltastik u cool, u cool

    (Source: youtube.com, via feminspire)

    — 17 hours ago with 232 notes
    #all about that bass  #ukelele cover  #racheltastik  #body positive  #fix it 

    huffingtonpost:

    WHY THIS WOMAN WOULD RATHER READ HARRY POTTER EROTICA THAN WATCH PORN

    When spoken word artist Brenna Twohy tells you that she is an unabashed devotee of all things “Potterotica” — erotic fiction based in the magical universe of Harry Potter — your response probably shouldn’t be that her taste is “unrealistic.” 

    Watch her full monologue here. 

    (Source: National Poetry Slam uploaded by Button Poetry)

    (via huffingtonpostwomen)

    — 19 hours ago with 12343 notes
    #fan fiction  #porn  #harry potter  #feminist porn 
    WOMEN’S HISTORY 101: THE BOOK LIST

    Part III in our Feminism 101 Book Series, this series particularly focuses on writing women back into history, and giving due attention to women figures of yesterday and today. This is a pro-books and pro-independent publishing blog—no links are to Amazon, and most are to independent publishers.

    • Who Is Ana Mendieta?- In the tradition of Maus and A Graphic History of the Beats, Christine Redfern’s explosive graphic novel serves the reader with the creative and political legacy of exiled Cuban artist Ana Mendieta. Women to know about.
    • At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance- Danielle McGuire’s history shatters stereotypes about the civil rights movement—that Rosa Parks was a docile old lady, that women were excluded, revealing the opposition to black women’s rape by white men that helped incite a revolution.
    • Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir- Deborah Miranda’s “tribal memoir” is part revisionist history of California Indians, part intimate memoir, and part poetic innovation; all parts necessary reading.
    • Women Who Kill- Ann Jones’ now-classic study of women, violence, and the conditions that spark violence, narrating the stories of women on the edges of society brought to kill (and be killed).
    • A People’s History of the United States- Howard Zinn’s revisionist history should be now-required reading for anyone ever forced to read a high school history textbook. The central innovator for bottom-up histories. (if you’ve already read this, continue the tradition with the poster book Celebrate People’s History!)
    • Witches, Midwives, & Nurses- now-legendary Barbara Erenreich and Deidre English pioneer women’s revisionist history with an expose on the interactions between the fear of women healers and political and economic suppression.
    • Valerie Solanas- Brienne Fahs writes the first biography on the woman who wrote the SCUM manifesto and shot Andy Warhol.
    • Hillbilly Women- Skye Moodey tackles two ignored subjects in nonfiction at once—oral history and Appalachia. So, so important for revealing the raw and multifaceted experiences of a largely misunderstood community.
    • Life in the Iron Mills- Rebecca Harding Davis wrote the “Uncle Tom’s Cabin of American capitalism,” largely considered the first careful expose of the U.S.’s very poor.
    • Assata: An Autobiography- Assata Shakur, Black Power Activist and the first woman on the FBI’s most wanted list speaks in her own words. Listen to her.
    • Pussy Riot! A Punk Prayer for Freedom- What place does music have in activism today? How much influence can activism have in a repressive society? Read the first and most comprehensive book on the group that captivated the world.
    • From Eve to Dawn: A History of Women in the World- Renowned feminist Marilyn French writes four installments filling in our understanding of world history to include the women who made it. Comprehensive, required reading.
    • The War Before- Black Panther activist and former political prisoner Safiya Bukhari writing about her experiences shifting from pre-med student to activist, the place of women in the black Panther movement, and the families left behind in the movement.
    • Redefining Realness  Janet Mock’s memoir of her experience claiming her own identity as a trans woman simultaneously provides an elegiac personal and community statement, and shows the enormous lack of other comparable writings available today.  
    • The Riot Grrrl Handbook- is in equal parts important feminist theory, and the most fun you’ll ever have with a book. A collection of zines that inspires and rages across the decades to the present day.
    — 21 hours ago with 235 notes
    #women's history  #people's history  #lgbtq  #feminism  #revisionist history 

    mslonelyhearts:

    HEY YOU. DO YOU WANT TO BE LIKE THESE STOCK PHOTO HAND MODELS AND READ MY EBOOK? YOU SHOULD. IT IS FREE AND ROMANTIC AND SEXY AND SHIT. DOWNLOAD IT HERE.

    Former FP intern Ella Dawson has an ebook. Ch-ch-check it out.

    — 23 hours ago with 8 notes
    #ella dawson  #erotica  #memory foam  #ebook 

    socialjusticekoolaid:

    Love “Da Man Wit the Chips” but Jameila White is the new “Protest MVP.” #staywoke #trill 

    (via yall)

    — 1 day ago with 109002 notes
    thefeministpress:

Hey there, socially conscious bloggers! As you may have already seen, Feminist Press is hosting this year’s STEMinism forum on October 23rd, 2014, at the CUNY Graduate Center. 
So what exactly is STEMinism? Well, it’s going to be a FREE forum that brings together 500 college and high school students to attend lectures and workshops that promote gender equality and innovation in STEM fields, while allowing them to make crucial networking connections with various industry professionals. The best part about the forum is not only that it helps those who have an interest in STEM supplement their passions, but that it can jumpstart an interest just as easily as nourish it.
And if this isn’t incentive enough, breakfast is provided, free of charge. 
If this (i.e.: science and donuts) sounds like something you, someone you know, or even your own followers would be interesting in attending…our sign up page is finally up!
Make sure to like our Facebook page, too! Click here:
Help us make a difference. See you there!

p.s. for all queries related to artwork, contact pia here:

Hey there everyone! We just wanted to let you guys know that along with Google and The American Museum of Natural History, Girls Who Code, Girl’s Develop it, and NYU’s Tisch ITP will be there as well! Make sure you guys all sign up to see all these different programs!

    thefeministpress:

    Hey there, socially conscious bloggers! As you may have already seen, Feminist Press is hosting this year’s STEMinism forum on October 23rd, 2014, at the CUNY Graduate Center. 

    So what exactly is STEMinism? Well, it’s going to be a FREE forum that brings together 500 college and high school students to attend lectures and workshops that promote gender equality and innovation in STEM fields, while allowing them to make crucial networking connections with various industry professionals. The best part about the forum is not only that it helps those who have an interest in STEM supplement their passions, but that it can jumpstart an interest just as easily as nourish it.

    And if this isn’t incentive enough, breakfast is provided, free of charge. 

    If this (i.e.: science and donuts) sounds like something you, someone you know, or even your own followers would be interesting in attending…our sign up page is finally up!

    Make sure to like our Facebook page, too! Click here:

    Help us make a difference. See you there!

    p.s. for all queries related to artwork, contact pia here:

    Hey there everyone! We just wanted to let you guys know that along with Google and The American Museum of Natural History, Girls Who Code, Girl’s Develop it, and NYU’s Tisch ITP will be there as well! Make sure you guys all sign up to see all these different programs!

    — 1 day ago with 41 notes
    #NYU  #google  #american museum of natural history  #girls who code  #girl develop it  #free  #sign up now 

    2damnfeisty:

    "14-year-old Parkview High School Freshman, Caleb Christian was concerned about the number of incidents of police abuse in the news.  Still, he knew there were many good police officers in various communities, but had no way of figuring out which communities were highly rated and which were not.  

    So, together with his two older sisters: Parkview High School senior Ima Christian, and Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology sophomore, Asha Christian, they founded a mobile app development company– Pinetart Inc., under which they created a mobile app called Five-O.

    Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer.  It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired.  These details are captured for every county in the United States. Citizen race and age information data is also captured.

    Additionally, Five-O allows citizens to store the details of each encounter with law enforcement; this provides convenient access to critical information needed for legal action or commendation.”

    Read more here. [x]

    Black Excellence

    (Source: skulls-and-tea, via ethiopienne)

    — 2 days ago with 85522 notes
    Meet FP’s Art Director Drew Stevens: “I couldn’t be a priest because I wanted to fall in love with a man…”

    image

    Last week, I got to sit down with Drew Stevens, Feminist Press’s Art Director. Drew was born in Cincinnati, but moved to Louisville, Kentucky when he was 10 and considers it his “spiritual home.” Drew has led quite the colorful life thus far. After studying architecture for two years at the University of Kentucky, Drew decided he wanted to be a Catholic priest, so he moved to northern Kentucky to attend seminary and finished his schooling there, graduating from Thomas More College with bachelor degrees in history and philosophy.  But it is his two years of training in architecture that he uses the most in his work as a graphic artist: the principles of two- and three-dimensional design, color theory, structural hierarchy.

    Drew said he developed an interest for architecture at a very young age. “When I was 5 years old, I flew in an airplane for the very first time. We were going from Cincinnati to Minneapolis, and had to change planes in Chicago. There was heavy cloud cover over all of Chicago, but the top of John Hancock Tower was popping up out of the clouds. To me, five years old, it was the most magical site I had ever seen in my life: this building popping out of clouds. That’s what got me interested in architecture. I wanted to build something that popped up out the clouds like that. Kind of Freudian…” After we giggled, he went onto explain how he went from wanting to be an architect to a priest:

    Well, I had always been aware of the spiritual self within me, but as a youngster — I was 20 years old when I went into seminary — all I knew was the Catholic Church,” he said. “I wanted to pursue a spiritual life. I didn’t really know what there was besides Catholicism so I gravitated toward it, but I only stayed for two years. I left seminary because I finally admitted to myself that I was gay and that I wanted to be gay. I couldn’t be a priest because I wanted to fall in love with a man. I stayed in the Catholic church for another three or four years after that. I had continued to believe that Catholicism was the spiritual path for me. The reason I left the Catholic church was actually completely political. In the mid-80s the pope was staging some sort of crackdown on homosexuals in the priesthood. In Louisville, where I was living, there was a hate crime law making its way through the local legislature. The archbishop publicly announced that he did not believe homosexuals needed any special protection under this hate crime. Well, I knew the archbishop and I knew that the archbishop said to all of his gay seminarians and gay priests, ‘As long as I am in this chair, you don’t have to worry about anything. You have special protection,’ but then he comes out to the public and says ‘Gays don’t need special protection.’ That was it. All of sudden I saw the hypocrisy that is so rampant the church hierarchy, the scales fell from my eyes. I was a Catholic one day, the next day—out—I just did not darken the door of a Catholic church again.  From there I embarked on a quest to absorb everything I could about Eastern religions, astrology, paganism, Jungism, Gaia theory … a quest I continue twenty-five years later.

    Drew’s definition of feminism is probably one of the most unique that I have come across during my series of interviews. Drew didn’t identity himself as a feminist until he started working at the Feminist Press:

    I wasn’t anti-feminist, I knew feminism was out there and I knew it was important, but I was too busy having a fabulous social life to think much of it. I didn’t feel as though it concerned me. Joining the Feminist Press, it began to concern me, and not just because it was my job to be concerned. I became aware on a much deeper level. What I have come to understand is the masculine primacy that predominates on Earth is not in balance with the energy of the universe. Within the universe, male and female are two very small parts of a much greater picture; but Earth is all about male and female energy. Earth is equally male and female and yet with this masculine hegemony in place the planet is completely out of whack. You can see the results of men being “in charge” everywhere: the wars, the destruction of the environment, the economic injustice, just the sheer brutality that we see every day in our entertainment — movies, TV, music. All of this malaise is absolutely tied to this imbalance of masculine over feminine  The survival of the planet is at stake here. We need to restore the feminine to her rightful place; we need a gender balance so that the earth will vibrate properly. It’s wobbling right now — it’s getting worse and worse. We need to honor the energy of the planet through gender equality. This really is the root. This is how I see it.

    Drew is probably one most poetic humans beings I have ever come across. He has one of the most welcoming presences I have ever encountered. One of my personal favorite memories of my summer at FP was seeing Marilyn Maye with him at 54 Below, the former Studio 54. Drew has truly transformed the look and feel of FP books. He designs covers that truly draw you in and lays out pages that continue to draw you into the world of the book.

    - Mariya, FP intern

    — 2 days ago with 2 notes
    #catholiscism  #gay  #priest  #FEMINISM  #love  #meet fp staff 
    Hey there, socially-conscious bloggers!FP is proud to announce that Bridgett M. Davis, author of the lovely soon-to-be-released Into the Go-Slow, has sent into the void her own personal website. Like Into the Go-Slow, Davis is absolutely fabulous and you should give her website and book some well-deserved love.
Click here to read about the woman whom Tayari Jones dubbed “a brilliant writer, a soulful artist, and a true citizen of the world.”

    Hey there, socially-conscious bloggers!

    FP is proud to announce that Bridgett M. Davis, author of the lovely soon-to-be-released Into the Go-Slow, has sent into the void her own personal website. Like Into the Go-Slow, Davis is absolutely fabulous and you should give her website and book some well-deserved love.

    Click here to read about the woman whom Tayari Jones dubbed “a brilliant writer, a soulful artist, and a true citizen of the world.”

    — 3 days ago with 4 notes
    7 things you didn’t know about the videos for Pantene’s #NotSorry and Always brand’s #LikeaGirl campaigns →

    thefeministme:

    1. Neither video has appeared as a commercial on television. Both were released on the Pantene and Always brands’ YouTube channels and then promoted via social media and subsequent publicity.

    2. Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg was a consultant for the Pantene video.“Women’s empowerment exercises can be tricky,” said Pantene spokesperson Cheri McMaster. “We wanted to make sure we were going down the right path.” Sandberg’s feedback? Glowing, McMaster said.”

    — 3 days ago with 33 notes

    thefeministme:

    A Beauty Queen Speaks Out About Street Harassment

    "Former Miss D.C. Jennifer Corey was groped on the Metro. She talks about her harassment for the first time, and we send a hidden camera onto the streets of New York to see how bad things really are."
    — 3 days ago with 227 notes